gucci and facebook join forces to combat violence against women

This year’s Chime for Change campaign will harness the power of the internet to combat gender inequality.

by Amy Campbell
|
Aug 12 2016, 1:07pm

Facebook and Gucci are both innovative, boundary-pushing brands that we're very happy to have in our lives. As such it makes sense that the two powerhouses are using their combined strength to stage a monumental event. Later this month, they will do exactly that, as part of Gucci's 2016 Chime for Change campaign.

Chime for Change was founded three years ago by Gucci's previous creative director Frida Giannini, in conjunction with singer Beyoncé and actor/activist Salma Hayek Pinault. The campaign came about after Giannini realized the role technology could play in giving marginalized women a voice, especially those living in underprivileged countries. Clearly, the Signora was well ahead of her time.

After the first two "hackathons" were held at the Twitter headquarters in America, this year, Gucci has announced it will partner with Facebook. The event, dubbed Chimehack 3, will see around 300 hackers, tech-industry experts, and non-profit leaders come together to discuss how the internet (and social media in particular) can combat issues surrounding gender-inequality, like education, health, justice and domestic violence. The aim of the weekend-long hackathon is to create solutions to the injustices women face through the use and development of technology.

Gucci's executive vice president and chief marketing officer Robert Triefus said the decision for Facebook to host the event was based on the social media mogul's ability to "activate" people to support gender equality. "Through Chimehack, we continue to mobilize issue and industry leaders and leverage top technology platforms like Facebook to create real change for women and girls around the world," he said.

Last year, Chime for Change threw a global concert, which saw Jessie J, Ellie Goulding, Florence Welch and Rita Ora perform, raising thousands of dollars for the 400 non-profit projects that are supported by the campaign, which affect girls and women in 86 countries worldwide. 

Credits


Text Amy Campbell