hedi slimane earns a small victory after suing ysl's parent company — again

This is the second legal proceeding the designer has entered into with Kering.

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Nov 8 2016, 2:54pm

Former YSL creative director Hedi Slimane's legal battles with Kering (the house's parent company) continue to drag on, with a second proceeding now underway in the Parisian courts. You may remember the original proceedings, which began in June, after the former YSL creative director asked Kering to reinstate the non-compete clause in his contract — they had lifted it following his departure. 

A non-compete clause prevents an employee from accepting a similar position at a competing company after they've been let go, and compensates them for the time they're unable to work. In Slimane's case, the non-compete clause would have stopped him from joining another luxury brand as creative director, had Kering not lifted it. Bizarrely, Slimane wanted Kering to reinstate the non-compete clause — and thus, provide him with the remuneration that comes with it. Presumably, Slimane had no intention of taking on a new creative director role, and wanted the cash instead of the career freedom. 

In June, a French court sided with Slimane, and ordered Kering to pay the designer $13 million, the same amount as the non-compete clause would've awarded him. Kering said it would appeal the decision, but according Agence France-Presse it did in fact award Slimane the payout, eventually.

The second battle began in October, Agence France-Presse report. Slimane is reportedly sued Kering once more, looking for another $11 million and certain 'shareholder's rights.' The designer allegedly argued that the terms laid out in his original contract effectively entitled him to a minority stake in Yves Saint Laurent.

Now, it appears some of Slimane's wishes have been granted. Yesterday Reuters reported a Paris commercial court agreed Slimane "should have access to financial information regarding Yves Saint Laurent." It's a victory for Slimane, and a member of the designer's legal team said he was "extremely satisfied" with the ruling.

Credits


Photography Mitchell Sams