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collina strada redesigns the everyday for spring/summer 16

Modernist furniture, natural fabrics and massive pink Mars rocks: welcome to Hillary Taymour’s (other) world.

by Emily Manning
|
Sep 14 2015, 9:20pm

Last season's Collina Strada presentation saw the launch of Social + Studies -- designer Hillary Taymour and stylist Gillian Wilkins' creative studio -- and its first series of objects: trapezoid floor-length mirrors that formed the set design. This season, New York-based Taymour was definitely back on the furniture tip, lifting inspiration from lived-in pieces.

"I've been doing a furniture collection so I've just been drawing shapes and shapes and shapes like a crazy person," she said backstage as her puppy, Pow Wow, scurried around the set. "So this season, it's all about reshaping your normal, everyday basic. I don't want to over-design anymore."

For Taymour, spring/summer 16's basics included mechanic-ish jumpsuits, calf-length shift dresses, dark denim jackets, and - as has become Collina Strada's staple - a few stand out leather separates. Boxy cuts and sleek lines were consistent throughout spring/summer 16's offerings, but Taymour's contrast between fabrications - think thick cotton canvasses and light, sheer linens - really nailed the diversity of a complete wardrobe. "All the right bodies in all the wrong fabrics," she joked.

That not-quite-natural theme carried across into Taymour's presentation as well. Cara Stricker and Drools performed a live soundtrack - alternating between pounding synth machinations and organic harmonies. Beauty was plain and simple, but slightly-off kilter, with girl's fingertips coated in a chalky white substance. Social + Studies launched its second object -- steel stools rendered in marble, and onyx - set against, what else, but a massive space rock. "I asked how to make a modern and slick piece come back to nature," Taymour said. "A massive pink rock from Mars."

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Credits


Text Emily Manning