sandy kim’s new show is full of secrets

In her latest work, photographer Sandy Kim captures herself and friends including Sky Ferreira, during wild highs, vulnerable lows, and all the intimate moments between.

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Mar 13 2015, 6:55pm

Sandy Kim's work is known for its honesty and intimacy. Her third solo exhibition, opening tonight at Ever Gold Gallery in San Francisco, is one of her most thoughtful. The large-scale prints that make up "How's the Weather Down There?" follow Kim herself, as well as those around her, and capture a feeling of jaded youth, immortalizing scenes that range from moody to free-spirited. While Kim's known aesthetic is present (she names Diane Arbus as an influence), there is a fresh level of frankness and emotion in her new work.

She explains that she wanted to pinpoint what makes her photos unique, and in doing so, examine a unique factor of her life: she's short. "Height is one of the most important physical traits that shape who we are and how we shape the world," Kim says. "My height has always given me a connection with children, some of the only other people who share my point of view…I think that adds an element of youth to my photos. Like the way my camera is always angled up and close, giving [subjects] a larger-than-life feel."

Don't mistake Kim's relation to a child's perspective for saccharine innocence, though. She explains that her youthful appearance is often disarming, allowing her to reach a deeper level of connection with her subjects and find those raw, voyeuristic moments that shape her approach. Kim garnered the attention of magazines, galleries and fellow artists with her work on the music scene, specifically her photos of the band Girls. She applies her talent for snagging people in wild highs and vulnerable lows to her latest work, giving us a glimpse of those in the midst of sharing secrets, adventures, hook-ups and heartbreak.

Sandy Kim's "How's the Weather Down There?" runs from March 13 through April 18 at Ever Gold gallery in San Francisco.

evergoldgallery.com

Credits


Text Courtney Iseman
Photography courtesy Sandy Kim