ones to watch cape town: part one

In 2016 Cape Town is proving to be one of the most exciting arts and culture destinations on the planet. Driven by a new wave making their own mark and catching global attention, they’re exploring what it means to be young in Africa today. i-D caught...

by i-D Staff
|
14 June 2016, 7:15am

Kalo Canterbury, 23, activist/student/DJ

Where's home?
Strictly Cape Town. I was born in Athlone and grew up in Ottery. Both areas form part of the Cape Flats.

What do you do?
I stunt daily and look fly as fuck. That's me, that's how I express who I am. Clothing and getting dressed has allowed me to break the walls of the box that the world put me in when I was born. Other than that, I'm a postgrad student studying the necessary evils of Marketing and Advertising. Oh, and I DJ sometimes.

Tell us about how the Cape Flats inspire you.
Sometimes I just walk or drive all the way down the main road and people watch. The people, style, sounds, smells, imagery — it's a sensory overload. Real style was invented here.

What are you passionate about?
The homies and my family. Knowledge and teaching yourself. Understanding others. Love. My girl. Counting my blessings. Instagram. Oh, and having a fucking good time.

What's a song that changed your life?
Got To Give It Up Part 1 by Marvin Gaye. That song is all about how being yourself is a massive party, it gave me the confidence I never knew I had.

What was your big break?
Walking in Cape Town Men's Fashion Week this year was next level. But I was more handsome than the male models.

When someone comes to town where do you take them?
To the local hood parties! Everyone kinda takes tourists and friends from outta town to the CBD to all these arty-farty parties and clubs in gentrified areas and that's mad boring. The best parties are closer to home or at someone's home.

Best advice you were ever given?
Don't assume how anyone else feels.

Advice you wish you were given?
You don't have to think so much all the time. 

@k.dollahz

Kyla Philander, 25, actress and filmmaker

Where's home?
I was born in Johannesburg but have been living in Cape Town for 20 years. I now live in a very strange but wonderful suburb called Brooklyn.

What are your three biggest influences right now?
Safety, access and the Internet.

What are you passionate about?
Representation within media.

Do you feel you've had your big break?
I think I'm still in the process of it because I'm pitching for funding for my first documentary in three days. It's my first pitch ever and I've gotten to this point all by myself and this is huge for me, even if I don't get the money.

Tell us about that process.
I've had to learn patience as a form of resistance. The film hierarchy as it exists in South Africa stresses me out; I'm really not interested in only becoming a director at 40. You need patience because people are scared to throw money at a young brown femme trying to tell stories. I am, however, ready. More importantly, so is the world.

What's something people don't realise about Cape Town?
It is kak racist here.

What are you looking forward to?
The revolution.

When someone comes to town where do you take them?
I invite them over for tea with my mom and me, in Brooklyn.

Best advice you were ever given?
Stop letting them tell our stories.

Advice you wish you were given?
The world hates you twice.

@colourpill

Lukhanyo Mdingi, 24, designer

Where's home?
I grew up in a small town in the Eastern Cape of South Africa called East London. I live in Cape Town now.

What are your biggest influences?
Africa, human communication, arts and culture.

What are you passionate about?
Life and my home, Africa.

When did everything change for you?
Definitely the moment I identified the true value and purpose of life.

Who are you tipping in 2016?
My fellow waiters at Clarke's Dining Bar!

What are you looking forward to?
Always my tomorrows.

What's something people don't know about Cape Town?
Fun Fact: Two couples get hitched on Table Mountain per month.

Best advice you were ever given?
Run your own race bro.

What advice do you wish you were given?
Consistency is the key to excellence.

@lukhanyomdingi

Dope Saint Jude, 26, rapper and producer

What are you passionate about?
Recreating and reimagining my reality.

Tell us about the art that changed your life.
The album was The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, the book was The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison and too many Bjork music videos to even begin to mention. But especially Big Time Sensuality, All Is full of Love, It's oh so Quiet, Venus as a Boy.

What about your big break?
Getting paid to be involved in an H&M campaign with MIA and using that cash to drop my debut EP.

Who are you tipping in 2016?
Car guards. In South Africa, we have people who watch your car every time you park. I usually get mad and get into spirited fights with car guards because I have a bike, but Imma be nice in 2016.

What are you looking forward to?
Traveling to different parts of the world with my EP and being able to connect with people because of it.

When someone comes to town where do you take them?
My mother's house, my favourite spot on the mountain to blaze and to The Waiting Room to dance.

Best advice you were ever given?
You only fail when you decide to give up. So success is a conscious decision.

Advice you wish you were given?
Read more books, dammit.

@dopesaintjude

Credits


Photography Russell Kleyn

Tagged:
Culture
Music
South Africa
Art
Fashion
Cape Town
Dope Saint Jude
lukhanyo mdingi
kalo canterbury
kyla philander