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​the records that changed logan sama’s life

Dire Straights, Kurt Cobain and Björk are all burrowed deep within the musical mind of grime guru Logan Sama.

by Hattie Collins
|
29 September 2015, 3:37pm

The gatekeeper of Grime is one of the scene's most influential figures. Through his seminal shows on Rinse, Kiss FM and now 1Xtra, Logan Sama has faithfully exported the genre to ears of all persuasions, while ensuring its essence and ethos is retained at all times. Tomorrow, he releases his FABRICLIVE83 compilation, which in a first for the series, comes in a very limited 4-LP vinyl format. Comprising of 24 original instrumentals created especially for Logan by everyone from Terror Danjer and Rapid to Maniac, Rude Kid and Preditah, and vocalled by everyone from Wiley to D Double E Mez and Novelist, this is an essential collector's piece. We asked Sama to delve deep into his mind and pick out the key musical moments of his life…

The very first song you remember hearing that made a real impact on you and influenced your decision to become a DJ later in life?
My first real memory of music, like really being aware of who made something and what it was called, was probably going through my Dad's cassettes in his little gym room when I was like 5 or 6 years-old. I remember he had classical box sets and also Sting and The Police, Blondie and Dire Straits in there. I loved the guitar solo on Money For Nothing. I used to listen to that over and over and then I'd rewind it again. I don't even know what I was doing up there. Just sitting on a weights bench and listening to music.

The song that reminds you most of being a teenager?
When I was a teenager, I got really into music. Radio 1 and Kiss really influenced me a lot and I listened to an eclectic bunch of music. Grunge and Rock from the late 80s/early 90s, happy hardcore, electronica and rave music, and then of course garage. I used to listen to the first Prodigy album continuously in my Walkman. I loved the tracks Charly, Your Love and Everybody In The Place.

A song or artist that people might be surprised to know you like?
I'm sure I've raised a few eyebrows already, but I really enjoy Dean Martin! I was driving the other day and my iPhone was linked to the bluetooth on random play and it went from Dino to Andrea Bocelli to Travis Scott to D Double E. An interesting sequence!

What song would soundtrack the opening credits to the movie of your life?
DJ Shadow's Midnight in a Perfect World.

What does the inside of your mind sound like?
Silence. It's very serene and peaceful in there.

Which song reminds you of someone special?
Björk's I Miss You.

Is there one song that always revives the rave?
The power of Rhythm N Gash is undeniable. I could play that on the surface of the moon and it would get a reload.

Which song would you happily never hear again?
There's plenty of songs I happily will never hear again. That's the beauty of choice and playlists.

What is your favourite Grime track of all time and why?
That's 12 years of history, hundreds of MCs, dozens of big producers, THOUSANDS of tracks! I couldn't possibly say. I really dislike playing favourites or ranking things. I have tunes I like and tunes that don't evoke a reaction from me. I can't really rank the emotional and energetic reactions that individual tracks give me. If I like a tune that's enough for me. I don't need to really think about if I like it more or less than another piece of work. I like to try and take each track on its own merit.

If you could only listen to one artist for the rest of your life, who would it be?
Kurt Cobain.

Which song would you like played at your funeral?
Whatever my future wife chooses. I'll be dead; it doesn't matter to me anymore. Whatever makes them feel the best they can at that moment.

What does the future sound like?
Grimy.

Logan launches FABRICLIVE83 is out now with a launch party at Fabric on the 9 October. Pre-order the CD set here and the very limited vinyl edition here.

Credits


Text Hattie Collins
Photography Olivia Rose

Tagged:
Grime
Logan Sama
music interviews
the records that changed my life