the best of pre-fall 17

Go to Copenhagen with Givenchy, explore a new Paris with Maria Grazia at Dior or believe in the promise of America with Valentino, pre-fall was a global explosion of inspiration.

|
Jan 13 2017, 3:15pm

Dior
Using her Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie borrowed slogan tees as a focal point, Maria Grazia Chiuri continued her theme of feminism and empowerment for pre-fall as well as a call for a multicultural look to the future. She mixed these themes with classic heritage logos and prints. The Dior logo, made famous in Galliano's saddle bag era is reimagined as a crossbody, 'Dior Addict' and 'J'Dior', tongue-in-cheek reference of Dior past are carefully placed on traditional double breasted coats and on the elastics of soft cup bras and boxer briefs, placed underneath wispy tulle embellished dresses. She revived some of the house's sartorial DNA from its birth year, tassels and nipped waists, and placed them alongside biker jackets, jacquard blazers and cropped jeans, a testament to how Dior history can live alongside its bright future. 

Read more on Dior

Valentino
Evolution, optimism, and romanticism were the words at the day inside New York's The Beekman Hotel for the pre-fall Valentino show. As the country awaits its President-Elect's controversial inauguration, Valentino's Creative Director Pierpaolo Piccioli decided to concentrate on the beauty of the human spirit; focussing on what unites us instead of what divides us. In what was described as ode to 'an America everyone dreams of: hope in mind and on the body', dresses in a floaty floral silk, floor-length gowns accented with glittery beading and knitted separates, topped with patchwork and 3D applique coats were unapologetically luxurious - all while Nina Simone's Feeling Good played in hush tones in the background, reminding us how important it is to remain hopeful for a better tomorrow.

Read more on Valentino.

Stella McCartney
Stella McCartney is the poster woman for modern British style so it is very fitting she dedicated her spring/summer collection to the "traditional English essence and its eclectic energy" and used Beano, one of the nation's great childhood cartoon favourites to communicate this message. Fashioning Korky, Dinah Mo and Cuddles and Dimples into prints for plastered across asymmetric button up shirts, drawstring pants and shirts, Stella says the collaboration with the cartoon is all about "celebrating the inner child in our spirit." Elsewhere Stella mixed the collection with her signature (and most importantly sustainable) cashmere sweaters and denim in a chic and playful show in Harlem's Cotton Club.

Read more on Stella McCartney.

Givenchy
Using the backdrop of Copenhagen's architecture, Riccardo Tisci rallied together models Iselin Steiro, Frederikke Sofie and Elsa Hosk to three of city's iconic locations to showcase his pre-fall 17 collection. The collection cleverly mixed all the sides that make the Givenchy woman, partly street, partly classic, imbued with all the ruffles and romance we have come to expect from Givenchy but are punched up with primary colour accents and powder pink flares and jackets. A nod to the warmth of colours the Scandinavian woods, traditional camel coats at alongside a tight edit of tailoring, and beaded gowns and separates, both in jet black. 

Read more on Givenchy.

Gucci
More is more. Don't you forget it. Not that you could: Alessandro Michele's Gucci has no signs of stopping the ideology that has underpinned his two-year tenure at the house. The DNA of the house hasn't differed for pre-fall, you can still expect a logo-laden, high impact and colourful collection, but its styling has been ramped up. Layers are key. Leggings on top of leggings on top of interlock Double G socks; heads wrapped in scarves, obstructed with audacious, glittery sunglasses. Even the garments themselves are layered, embellishment on top of velvet skirts, clashing prints, embroidery on top of nylon zip ups, cat motifs on wool sweaters and prim bows; accents on shocking magenta jackets. Warning, this collection is not for those who are faint of heart.

Read more on Gucci.

Credits


Text Lynette Nylander