meet the new gen of german film

With the 67th Berlinale film festival just wrapped, i-D Germany speaks to the country's brightest young talents.

by i-D Staff
|
21 February 2017, 8:40am

Each year the international film community heads to the Berlinale, which has, for well over half a century, become host to the best global talent, revealing the next great films and stars. Germany has established itself as fertile ground for developing serious acting chops, and the below new-comers are set to continue that reputation. i-D Germany spoke to stars-in-the making about seeing themselves on screen for the first time, how they overcome self-doubt and what they think success feels like. 

Luise Befort, 20, known for her role in Club der roten Bänder

Describe the feeling of seeing yourself on screen for the very first time...
That was weird, because normally you don't see yourself in that way. Of course you look in the mirror, but it's strange to see yourself acting out different emotions. It's really exciting to see yourself from a different perspective.

How do you define success
Success is when you want to achieve something and you just go for it. When you have a dream and make it happen. And every little step towards that dream.

Do you have any hidden talents?
 I danced flamenco for eight years as a kid.

What's been your biggest challenge in your career so far, and how did you handle it?
I had to be really terrified for my last role, that was a big challenge. I would wake up with my heart beating really fast because I had to live in that state of fear every single day. Each new role is a fresh challenge, that's what makes acting so fun.

Which of your film scenes is most memorable for you?
Shooting for the German TV Series Club der roten Bänder was an emotional roller coaster. For me, the most intense scene was the finale of season two. Six people were crying. After the take, the whole set went silent, even the camera guys were crying.

Do you have self-doubts? 
I think everyone has self-doubts, those moments when you start to think: 'Am I making the right life choices' or, 'Am I good enough?'. I do that a lot. Then I'm on set and see all these wonderful people and think: 'This is the best thing in the world right now, standing here and creating something beautiful with these people.' The doubts vanish.

@lubef

Noah Saavedra, 25, known for his role in Egon Schiele

Describe the feeling of seeing yourself on screen for the very first time...
I was sweating like nothing else and I actually tried to hide my eyes behind my hands. It's so weird to see yourself on screen. There are so many different perspectives you don't normally see of yourself. 

What's been the biggest challenge in your career so far, and how did you handle it?
Playing a character based on an actual person for Egon Schiele [a film based on the life of the Austrian figurative painter]. I prepared for more than a year and half for that role with the director. We did life drawing classes and body exercises to find out how this man really felt and what he was like as a person. 

How do you define success?
Speaking of success in terms of my job, I'd say being able to find compelling roles that encourage a conversation. 

Do you have self-doubts? 
I question myself a lot, but I think it's part of the job to a certain degree. Too much self-confidence is not helpful. I often think that others act better. When I see other actors I don't see their self-doubts the way I feel my own.

What scene are you most proud of?
That would be the one the director thinks is the worst. It's a short one. Egon Schiele's muse runs out of the house and he wants to pay her again for the session. He runs after her, but she thinks he already paid her. Of course, they mean something else entirely than just money. They don't want to let go of each other. And the dance scene, because I didn't have to talk.

Langston Uibel, 19, known for his role in Sanctuary

Who do you look up to?
No actor, but the people who fought for the rights of black people. They were amazing and fascinating. Without them I wouldn't be sitting here and doing what I do. They are my role models.

What's been the biggest challenge in your career so far, and how did you handle it?
The film Sanctuary for sure. Time was a huge helping factor. Sometimes you just need a little time to understand and feel a character. When you know how the character talks, you got it. In the end, the character turned out to be different than the one in the script. You need to be able to reflect on your abilities and you have to know what you're truly capable of. When you feel confident, pursue it even further! You never know what can happen. Ten people tell you that 'you suck', but the eleventh person thinks you're the best actor in the world. So, it's important to just carry on.

Which of your film scenes do you remember the most?
There's this one scene in Sanctuary. I start to sing and dance, then we start a revolt and in the end everyone sings and dances. That's a strong and emotional scene and I'm proud of it.

Do you have self-doubts?
There will always be moments in your life in which you think nothing is working and that others don't care about you. But that can change literally within a day. You need to stay true to yourself and who you are. I constantly question myself, but not in the sense of 'I can't do anything right' because we always make mistakes.

@langstonuibel

Louis Hofman, 19, known for his role in Land of Mine

Describe the feeling of seeing yourself on screen for the very first time...
I was overwhelmed and happy, because you wait like forever to see the final product.

How do you define success?
Being able to be proud of the things you worked for and get recognition from people in the industry. And of course, when the audience likes the film I'm in.

Who do you look up to?
That would be the German actor Tom Schilling, Eddy Redmayne and Leonardo DiCaprio.

What scene are you most proud of?
This scene was ultimately cut out in the end, but I had to be very angry and very strong, I'm nothing like that in real life. After it was shot I left the set and started crying. The director said to me, 'You know why you're crying? You went to places you've never been before.' That was a special moment, because I understood what acting is all about. Experiences you wouldn't necessarily have otherwise, and discovering new parts of yourself. 

@louishofmann

Svenja Jung, 23, known for her role in Fucking Berlin and Centre of my World

Describe the feeling of seeing yourself on screen for the very first time...
That was crazy. It's not you, but a different character. Hearing your own voice is something extraordinary, because you don't get that normally. That's special and magical.

You're in your early 20s and you live in Berlin. How much could you relate to your character in Fucking Berlin?
There are definitely similarities between us. Sonja and I were both born in a village and moved to Berlin. But of course, she takes another direction. We both share a sense of freedom, naivety and hunger for just doing stuff.

Which of your film scenes do you remember the most?
I'm very proud of the scenes in Centre of my World, they feel natural and authentic. And in terms of Fucking Berlin, that would be the emotional scene at the end. I have a breakdown and beg my boyfriend to stay.

How did you get into acting?
I realised how much I like telling stories. I went to an open call and found my agent — that's how it all started.

Do you have self-doubts? 
I think we always have self-doubts and that's normal in any profession I guess. Actors especially always tend to question if they're enough. I was on holidays for a while recently, and went back to filming just last week. I had to get into it again and felt like a beginner on the first day.

How do you define success?
Being able to be proud of what I'm doing. Getting the recognition and being able to feel satisfied and feel at ease.

@svenjajung

Anand Batbileg, 15, known for his role in Tschick

Describe the feeling of seeing yourself on screen for the very first time...
That was a very funny feeling. It's hard to describe though. It brought back a lot of memories of filming. I liked that.

How did you get into acting?
By coincidence. My father works in the Mongolian embassy here in Berlin and got an email with an open casting call for Tschick.  My father showed me the email and I went to a casting and got the part.

What's been the biggest challenge in your career so far, and how did you handle it?
The scene in which Tschick hurts his foot, because we had jump into the water. It was at the end of October and I had to do it over and over again.

Do you have any hidden talents?
I'm still figuring that out, but I'm pretty good at maths.

@anandbatbileg

Tristan Göbel, 14, known for Tschick

How did you get into acting?
My sister was approached by scouts during a school trip. My mother signed us all up afterwards and we immediately got to play parts in movies. It was pretty straightforward.

How do you define success?
To make it big, but to stay grounded at the same time, not to get arrogant. Getting roles is a matter of pure luck. You only get offers when you have fun at what you do.

Do you have any hidden talents?
I play the violin in our family band and I sing.

Which of your film scenes do you remember the most?
That would be the lake scene in Tschick, but I also vividly recall shooting scenes for my latest movie Bright Nights. We had to stay for five minutes in a freezing cold lake. There's one scene in which I had to yell at my father and let any anger out of my system. I was shaking afterwards. That was a proud moment for me.

Describe the feeling of seeing yourself on screen for the very first time...
It was strange, because you always see mistakes or remember the filming. In the case of Tschick, I could actually remember the words and recalled the experience. That was awesome.

@tristangöbel

Credits


Photography Oliver Blohm
Production and layout Alexandra Bondi de Antoni
Production and interviews Juule Kay 
Hair and makeup Adrielle Santos Peukert
Photo assistance Jessica Lopez and Michael Nast
T-Shirts: Uniqlo