the one-night art show promising to discuss desires, sexuality and relationships in the digital age

Lotte Andersen’s Weird Sex explores the strange dynamics of relationship politics in post-internet culture.

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17 June 2016, 2:55pm

We are living in confusing times. The internet generation don't mean what they say, they mean what they tweet, and this is no more prevalent than in the already murky waters of relationships. We overshare on Instagram to catch the eye of our ex and shy away from real-life conversations with those we fancy; and with a new dating app and DM device created what seems like everyday, we can bet things are going to become even more complicated. Which is why artist and art director Lotte Andersen has chosen to explore the dynamics of relationship politics with her new art show Weird Sex. Showing as part of the TPS programme at Bold Tendencies, Lotte has gathered some of London's brightest and most creative luminaries to share the night with her and an intimate audience whilst they endeavour to unpick the complex tapestry of sexuality and relationships in the digital age. Poet James Massiah, founder of Sadface.Club Sienna Murdoch, artists Matthew Stone, Phoebe Collings-James and writer and lecturer Reba Maybury all feature in what Lotte describes as the "most natural evolution after MAXILLA," her beloved West London club night where the homemade photocopied posters on the walls explored many of the themes Weird Sex will look to continue to discuss in conversation. We asked Ms. Andersen why she felt the burning desire to put the show together and when, exactly, sex got weird.

What prompted you to want to put the show together?
Weird Sex feels like the most natural evolution after MAXILLA. With Weird Sex, I want to try and explain some of the themes from the artwork of the party - the naivety in romance, the over-sharing, the optimism, the screenshots, the confusion that arises from post-internet love. It feels like I have now become the older cousin who's still cool and sexy, but has read few more books than you, and been in a few relationships. You still want her shoes though!

From artists to poets and writers, the disciplines of the participants of the show span far and wide. Why did you specifically choose the participants you did?
This project has come after moving into a new living space and the people coming over. The subsequent conversations we were having felt vital and timely. Each person contributing or talking was chosen specifically. Sienna Murdoch created what I dubbed an "emotional network" with Sadface.Club, an online community, with a voice an aesthetic and very practical helplines. Phoebe Collings-James is showing her Broken Hearts Requiem a video piece, which shows an amalgamation of female singers hitting the crescendo of emotion within power ballads. Phoebe's piece was made before social media took hold but felt right. Reba Maybury is an activist, publisher and dominatrix. She founded Wet Satin Press and creates zines using artwork made by her slaves. I looped James in when I heard a track on NTS, I was trying to leave to house but his story of a flirtation and frustration stopped me in my tracks... he's a poet and a darling! Matthew Stone is an artist and honestly has the most acerbic witty tongue! I'm the glue that holds it all together I guess!

The format promises to be quite informal and interactive. Was this intentional?
I think there's nothing better than a chat with your mates over pizza in a huge room with a good soundsystem. What's the point of a talk where everyone is uncomfortable? I come from throwing parties where you are just trying create comfortable atmospheres. It's important to open up these conversations to the public.

Where did the name Weird Sex come from?
It's a play on Weird Science - it's light, it's funny, it's true. Things are very weird at the moment.

What can the audience expect?
An alternative to what is going on. Nightlife needs to be broadened; it's about time!

Weird Sex is part of the TPS programme at Bold Tendencies on Saturday June 18th at 95a Rye Lane, Peckham, London. Get your tickets here.

Credits


Text Lynette Nylander