​cara d lights up the screen in her first major film

The super is the best thing about 'The Face of an Angel,' out tomorrow.

by Colin Crummy
|
26 March 2015, 1:38pm

The Face of an Angel may look like a risky film for Cara Delevingne to announce her arrival on the big screen, since its premise takes its cue loosely from the murder of British student Meredith Kercher in Perugia, Italy in 2007. But instead of a sensationalist TV movie style reconstruction, director Michael Winterbottom turns the focus outwards and on to the journalists, bloggers and viewers reporting, commenting on and watching the horror and asks why we are so fascinated by murder. Even so, it's not exactly one to garner easy Insta likes.

The Face of an Angel is a fascinating, complex piece of work. Daniel Bruhl plays Thomas Lang, the one-hit wonder director who arrives in the Italian university town hoping to turn out a hit script from the drama unfolding. Instead he becomes mired in crisis, only to be pulled from the brink by Delevingne's character, Melanie, an energetic young British student.

Melanie knows the all the best people, drinks to order (she's serving) and where all the big parties are in town. So far, so very Cara Delevingne. It's fair to say the character doesn't read like so much of a stretch for the model, but director Winterbottom makes Delevingne's character the one on which his fictional director's life - and the film's own mood - turn.

Cara proves more than up to the task, infusing The Face of an Angel with an optimism and free spiritedness that is infectious. What's most striking is how natural she is. "The point of this film is that it is so real," Cara's said of the role. "The way he directs, all Michael wants is that kind of naturalism - he doesn't for one minute want any kind of stylized 'acting'. That's why he will just leave the camera on and ask you to improvise."

It bodes well for Delevingne's raft of big screen outings to come. These include the adaptation of the Martin Amis novel London Fields, YA novel adaptation Paper Towns, and pulling on some superhero lycra for DC Comics' Suicide Squad.

Tagged:
Culture
Cara Delevingne
Review
face of an angel
michael winterbottom