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      art Courtney DeWitt 4 November 2015

      onscreen explorer goes irl voyeur in emile zile's 'desktops'

      The artist’s latest exhibition sees crystals, Red Bull in oil burners and candles burning on Ikea flatpack packaging.

      onscreen explorer goes irl voyeur in emile zile's 'desktops' onscreen explorer goes irl voyeur in emile zile's 'desktops' onscreen explorer goes irl voyeur in emile zile's 'desktops'
      emile zile

      Australian born, Amsterdam educated artist Emile Zile's practice has long had a preoccupation with digital culture, and more specifically, human communication in this internet age. Previous outputs from the artist have seen site specific live performances utilising powerpoint presentations and existing multimedia to create completely new works, as well as original film works capturing the traces of humanity remaining in and on digital artifacts.

      In his latest exhibition, Desktops, opening this week in Melbourne, Zile continues to explore our lived experience in consolidation with technology. The show sees the artist bring the humble desktop IRL by assembling workplace 'altars' complete with crystals, Red Bull in oil burners and candles burning on Ikea flatpack packaging and scaled up computer desktop images made into aluminium desktop-size objects.

      These aluminium screen captures are live poetic insights into the users personal computer experience, creating individual narratives across ten unique 'desktops' all named as a random file. Afterall a desktop says a thousand words...Scroll through.

      Desktops will be open to view from November 5th until the 21st. A closing performance by Emile Zile will occur at 5.00pm on the exhibition's last day Saturday November 21st.

      FORT DELTA Shop 59 Capitol Arcade 113 Swanston Street Melbourne VIC 3000

      @emilezile 

      Credits

      Text Courtney DeWitt

      Photography Courtesy Emile Zile

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      Topics:emile zile, art, digital culture, desktops

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