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vetements' guram gvasalia reveals why the brand is always sold out

They've engineered it that way.

by Isabelle Hellyer
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06 March 2017, 11:05am

In Vetements' world, nothing is left to chance. Brothers Guram and Demna Gvasalia are thoughtful, strategic men — and they're in it for the long haul. In a new interview with WWD, Guram discussed the issues facing the fashion industry today — "no one wants to think long-term" — and his strategies to stay forever exclusive, despite ever increasing demand. 

"No one thinks about long-term structures, everyone thinks about today and making the sales today," Guram explains, chalking it up to social media, increasingly obsessive brand worship, and an industry-wide desire to push forward and grow. Guram is quick to clarify that growth is not at the top of his agenda. "When I think about the word growth, I think about a child," he explains. "Because I consider Vetements as our child. And then I'm thinking the child is growing. And once it reaches a certain age, and a certain maturity, it actually needs to stop growing. Because otherwise it will be a very ugly child. The same is with the brand, they're always speaking about growing, but at the end of the day there should be a certain limit."

READ: the year the gvasalias conquered fashion

Limits, smart limits, are central to every aspect of the brand's ethos. "We don't put all the merchandise in the market at the same time. If you drop too much product, you lose attention," Guram says. At the same time, compounding Vetements' exclusivity, they avoid being forced to make markdowns. "The point is if you go to see clothes on sale, it means there was more supply than there was demand," he explains. "We always supply less than the demand, so we're always sold out. It's easier to sell one piece less than the market wants, so you are sold out rather than to sell a piece extra, and it doesn't sell. This is why we've been doing this and it's been working so far." In an industry often fixated with more, it's nice to hear someone advocating for less.