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young londoners on what makes them hopeful for the future

Photographer Ellius Grace takes to the streets of the capital.

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May 24 2018, 7:52am

Photography Ellius Grace

Jordan Charles, 24, London and Cornwall

Describe your generation... We’re definitely the internet generation. Who do you consider to be the voice of your generation? I don’t feel like the voice of a generation is one individual. Social media is the platform gives everyone a voice. What change would you like to see in the world in 2018? I’d love to see more diverse representation in the mainstream media for 2018. Genuine representation, not just to hit diversity quotas. What makes you hopeful for the future? Seeing so many people standing up to stereotypes and challenging perceptions really makes me happy, we’re not taking shit any more and I feel like we’ll see a lot of change off the back of this.

Tosia Leniarska, 20, Warsaw

Describe your generation... Pushing it. When do you feel most confident? Dressed up silly in a club. What is the most important thing happening in culture right now? The push for intersectionality. What change would you like to see in the world in 2018? They better fucking start paying us! What makes you hopeful for the future? Kids smarter than me.

Julia Campbell-Gillies, 21, South Africa

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Describe your generation... Impatient, uncompromising, sick of your shit. When do you feel most confident? When I'm informed. Who do you consider to be the voice of your generation? I think my generation's identity is founded on a distinctly critical view of "figureheads" and leaders. The "voice" has been democratised, and no longer has a face, only potential. The voice of my generation is a chorus. What change would you like to see in the world in 2018? Less plastic, more justice. This is your chance to speak out. What have you got to say? Trust yourself, don't make excuses, don't let perfectionism distract you from being better.

Louis Chen, 21, Beijing

Describe yourself... Soft. Describe your generation... Anxious. What change would you like to see in the world in 2018? Less air pollution. What makes you hopeful for the future? Love, love and more love from my friends and family. This is your chance to speak out. What have you got to say? Try hard, try harder.

Lloyd Clipston, 21, Harrogate

Who do you consider to be the voice of your generation? Blinky -- if you know, you know. What is the most important thing happening in culture right now? The continuation of DIY ethics and publishing within art and music. What change would you like to see in the world in 2018? A new Su Tissue record. What makes you hopeful for the future? Doing more art, making more books -- I might not work in a coffee shop forever.

Izzy Moriarty Thompson, 21, south-east London

Describe your generation... A diverse spectrum of young individuals, that are frightened and excited for the future of society. Who do you consider to be the voice of your generation – and why? I don’t believe a whole generation can be fully represented by just one voice, my generation is made up of a collection of voices and that’s really important to me. What makes you hopeful for the future? People speaking out about their sexuality and gender.


Daphne Papa, Athens, Hellenic Republic

Describe your generation... Poor, hopeless, individualistic, accepting, adaptive. Who do you consider to be the voice of your generation? Stefani Nurding, the embodiment of the power of female seduction, plus very gnarly. What is the most important thing happening in culture right now? I have to confine my answer to what appeals to a mass audience so I’ll say the Kardashians. An almost totalitarian matriarchal family living in abundance. Their family rooted in a war torn country that has suffered a very recent and still widely unrecognised genocide; their fame rooted in crime and pornography. A simulacrum of a future society.


Lily Jean Bridger, 21, south London

Who do you consider to be the voice of your generation? There are many people who I consider to be the voice of our generation, the most influential people are those who are able to use their public profiles to speak out against issues which other people can relate to. Such as, Jennifer Lawrence and Stormzy. What is the most important thing happening in culture right now? Young people transcending boundaries. What change would you like to see in the world in 2018? This seems unrealistic but I’d like to see people being more tolerant and understanding of others.

Joy Miessi, 24, London

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Describe your generation... DIY. So many talented and driven creatives putting themselves out there, throwing their own events, creating magazines and music, and using whatever we have. What is the most important thing happening in culture right now? I like that our generation uses social media as a voice to inform and to create positive social change. What change would you like to see in the world in 2018? Conflict free mobile phones. This is your chance to speak out. What have you got to say? Keep a diary, write, create... your story is valid.

Omar O'Reilly, 23, Dublin

When do you feel most confident? Walking out of the barbers with that fade on fleek! What is the most important thing happening in culture right now? Repeal the 8th. What change would you like to see in the world in 2018? It would be nice if none of the decent clubs and venues got replaced by a hotel. What makes you hopeful for the future? Psytrance. This is your chance to speak out. What have you got to say? If you find yourself in a closed loop, not knowing what direction to go next in life, try something different, put yourself out of your comfort zone and the unexpected will enlighten you.

Credits


Photography Ellius Grace

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