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It would be impossible to write a biography on Michael Jackson without the page count of a tome. So mammoth were his talents as a singer, dancer, writer, actor, director, producer, philanthropist, and all-encompassing visionary that words fail to cover his pioneering achievements. But narrowing down the subject matter to fashion, his life goes something like this: Born in Gary, Indiana in 1958, Michael rode the disco wave alongside his brothers, performing as The Jackson Five in bonkers outfits until he went solo in 1979 and debuted a smarter, suit-clad Michael. He would soon be covered in elaborate glitter uniforms that could easily rival both Napoleon and Liberace. Infatuated with military attire, he merged it with the sequined stage wardrobe he’d grown up with, while introducing Michael Jackson trademark pieces such as the sequined glove and socks, the fedora, the wore-down Florsheim shoes, and the cropped trousers, and later on, the arm bandage, the fingertip tape, and the black silk surgical mask. Each item was meant to draw the eye to a specific part of Michael’s body when he was dancing, while serving as little mysteries to keep the press guessing. Michael was all about the magic. While Michael Bush and Dennis Tompkins served as his personal dressmakers until his untimely death in 2009, Michael worked with and wore a number of designers throughout his career, including Roberto Cavalli, Gianni Versace, Christophe Decarnin, Hedi Slimane, Ann Demeulemeester, Helmut Lang, Tom Ford, Alessandro Dell’Acqua, and Dexter Wong. He was buried in his favourite white pearl jacket, his trusted Levi’s 501s (with a customised spandex crotch for his signature high kick dance move), a gold wrestling belt with storyteller carvings, worn-in Florsheims, and the Ray-Ban aviators he had his tailors buy in bulk. Michael Jackson was, and will forever be, the King of Pop.

michaeljackson.com

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